Dominoes vs. The Great Leap Forward

If you missed Nathan Smith’s TCS article on the ongoing saga of Social Security reform, do check it out.

Bush’s plan for carve-out private accounts would have amounted, institutionally, to a sort of Great Leap Forward. DeMint’s plan will set in motion incremental changes which may be compared to knocking down a row of dominoes. The first domino to fall is the payroll tax surplus in the Trust Fund. The second domino will be the excessive scheduled benefits that drive the program into long-term bankruptcy. The third domino will be the restriction of personal retirement accounts (initially created as lockboxes to stop the raid on the Trust Fund) to T-bonds. When that falls, all Bush’s Social Security reform goals will have been accomplished, and we’ll have a system of forced savings and private accounts.

Suppose that the DeMint plan passes and personal accounts are created from the surplus, then fast-forward two years. Now every working person under 55 — well over 100 million Americans — will own a personal retirement account consisting of US Treasury bonds. Since everyone and his brother knows that Social Security can’t pay promised benefits in the long run, most young people will see these accounts as their sole source of real retirement security. But they’ll also realize that the personal accounts are too small to underwrite a comfortable retirement. Moreover, they will learn that new money will cease being deposited in their accounts after about 2018, when the Baby Boomers’ retirement puts an end to the surpluses.

At this point, there will be pressure from younger voters to increase the size of their personal retirement accounts. If, up until now, the Social Security program has consisted of one-sided class warfare, with the old fighting against the young and the young not defending themselves, personal accounts will clarify younger generations’ stake in the fight.

Nice account of what perhaps should have been the strategy all along. I don’t have a good independent sense of what DeMint’s odds are. Probably not great, but better than than is being reported.